Challenges for global health

The consequences of climate change like water crisis, emerging & novel diseases, pandemics, the impact of irresponsible individual and social behaviour engender utter challenges for humanity. We should step up to solve pandemics and health problems generated by human behaviour or social interactions like unhealthy consumer habits, lifestyle, marketing or the imprudent use of antibiotics. We have to be ready to resolve the concerns raised by decision making or business models that deliver short term gains instead of long term sustainability, or monopoly pricing instead of accessibility and equity in health. The high level commitment to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) provides an unprecedented momentum to work on solutions in the comprehensive range of determinants of health.

Better Health, Stronger WHO

With responsibility for global health, as the director general of WHO I should work for:
  • helping people on this planet to be healthier and more cautious for their health,
  • promoting universal health coverage to protect the healthy and those who get sick and fostering health systems which are resilient, equitable and ever growing in quality,
  • properly trained, committed, motivated, innovative health labour force to provide health promotion, prevention, cure and care,
  • a strong WHO as the indisputable, impartial and independent leader in global health.

Better Health, Stronger WHO

With responsibility for global health, as the director general of WHO I should work for:
  • helping people on this planet to be healthier and more cautious for their health,
  • promoting universal health coverage to protect the healthy and those who get sick and fostering health systems which are resilient, equitable and ever growing in quality,
  • properly trained, committed, motivated, innovative health labour force to provide health promotion, prevention, cure and care,
  • a strong WHO as the indisputable, impartial and independent leader in global health.

Better Health

Two front struggle for health improvement - those in need and urgency should come first
Fighting pandemics with utmost agility and culturally tailored interventions. Supporting local developments and actions with global rapid response teams, complementing weak or missing capacities. Special attention should be paid to countries emerging from conflicts without public administration systems. Public health structures should be integral part of the reconstruction, respecting national leadership.
Fighting NCDs globally with social mobilisation and awareness for behaviour change.


Sharing the risk in universal health coverage and pandemics
Despite the unprecedented efforts of global donors we have to understand that neither the implementation of SDGs nor sharing the risks could be managed without sustainable funding. It is time to start the long term effort for institutional resource generation to foster universal coverage and promote pandemic risk sharing. Innovative economic models for generating resources could only happen in dialogue with governmental, civil and non governmental actors. Investments in health should promote efficiency, prioritizing prevention, promotion, primary care and integrated patient pathways.


Health human resources developments and balancing migration globally in coordinated partnership
Building universal health coverage starts with strong foundations of community and primary care professionals. The Global Code of Practice on the International Recruitment of Health Personnel should be complemented with global, regional and national strategic actions in human resources development recognizing the link between health employment and economic growth.


Promoting innovation and technology to improve accessibility and equity
Latest technological developments make new forms prevention and of care possible and offer new opportunities for humanity. mHealth, eHealth solutions, wearable devices and point of care technologies can take cost effective diagnostics and therapy to places where they never existed before and can provide health care for those in the flow of migration.
In dialogue with a broad range of stakeholders we have to work for new innovative business models for high priced medicines and technologies, and new antibiotics.

Stronger WHO

Impartial leader in global health and change for health
I envisage a strong WHO as the indisputable, impartial and independent leader in global health and a leading international change agent for health. Breaking out of the inbreeding of our internal professional wish lists, the health community should be able to influence the agendas of political leaders and fiscal decision makers and make them act towards solutions. WHO should take a role of independent knowledge centre and translate knowledge to action in assistance to member states in their developments and health reforms.


Resilient, action and performance oriented WHO
Promoting the idea of resilient health systems towards member states, should go hand in hand with working for a resilient WHO. The global portfolio of projects should be managed in a structured framework focusing on teamwork, results, problem solving, and be enhanced by my personal commitment and accountability for member states. We should improve change management capacities and capacities for culturally tailored local interventions together with the development of rapid response teams and task forces to support and complement country efforts. We should rebuild trust and prevent scapegoating by strengthening the risk communication capabilities. Performance and trust is vital to stabilize funding of WHO and its priority programmes.


Evidence based health policy together with change methodology
In many cases we have sufficient evidence and proper solutions in theory for WHAT should be done. We also have the sad experience that the best theoretical solutions fail in implementation when we have to initiate behavioural change. Let's change our experiences with a high failure rate in change or local actions. Changes should be evidence based and balanced with behavioural insights. No technical solution is valid without an implementation and consultative change methodology. No external solution is valid without local ownership. Working on WHAT should go together with HOW. This approach will be the key methodological element of my work.


Renewed global partnership
Health problems are far more urging and challenging than what a single organisation could ever face. I will work to achieve effective collaboration partnerships and coordinated actions within UN and with member states, donors, international stakeholders and civil society. WHO should renew partnerships acting as a leader umbrella organization in its changing institutional environment.

Better Health, Stronger WHO

With responsibility for global health, as the director general of WHO I should work for:
  • helping people on this planet to be healthier and more cautious for their health,
  • promoting universal health coverage to protect the healthy and those who get sick and fostering health systems which are resilient, equitable and ever growing in quality,
  • properly trained, committed, motivated, innovative health labour force to provide health promotion, prevention, cure and care,
  • a strong WHO as the indisputable, impartial and independent leader in global health.

Better Health

Two front struggle for health improvement - those in need and urgency should come first
Fighting pandemics with utmost agility and culturally tailored interventions. Supporting local developments and actions with global rapid response teams, complementing weak or missing capacities. Special attention should be paid to countries emerging from conflicts without public administration systems. Public health structures should be integral part of the reconstruction, respecting national leadership.
Fighting NCDs globally with social mobilisation and awareness for behaviour change.


Sharing the risk in universal health coverage and pandemics
Despite the unprecedented efforts of global donors we have to understand that neither the implementation of SDGs nor sharing the risks could be managed without sustainable funding. It is time to start the long term effort for institutional resource generation to foster universal coverage and promote pandemic risk sharing. Innovative economic models for generating resources could only happen in dialogue with governmental, civil and non governmental actors. Investments in health should promote efficiency, prioritizing prevention, promotion, primary care and integrated patient pathways.


Health human resources developments and balancing migration globally in coordinated partnership
Building universal health coverage starts with strong foundations of community and primary care professionals. The Global Code of Practice on the International Recruitment of Health Personnel should be complemented with global, regional and national strategic actions in human resources development recognizing the link between health employment and economic growth.


Promoting innovation and technology to improve accessibility and equity
Latest technological developments make new forms prevention and of care possible and offer new opportunities for humanity. mHealth, eHealth solutions, wearable devices and point of care technologies can take cost effective diagnostics and therapy to places where they never existed before and can provide health care for those in the flow of migration.
In dialogue with a broad range of stakeholders we have to work for new innovative business models for high priced medicines and technologies, and new antibiotics.


Stronger WHO

Impartial leader in global health and change for health
I envisage a strong WHO as the indisputable, impartial and independent leader in global health and a leading international change agent for health. Breaking out of the inbreeding of our internal professional wish lists, the health community should be able to influence the agendas of political leaders and fiscal decision makers and make them act towards solutions. WHO should take a role of independent knowledge centre and translate knowledge to action in assistance to member states in their developments and health reforms.


Resilient, action and performance oriented WHO
Promoting the idea of resilient health systems towards member states, should go hand in hand with working for a resilient WHO. The global portfolio of projects should be managed in a structured framework focusing on teamwork, results, problem solving, and be enhanced by my personal commitment and accountability for member states. We should improve change management capacities and capacities for culturally tailored local interventions together with the development of rapid response teams and task forces to support and complement country efforts. We should rebuild trust and prevent scapegoating by strengthening the risk communication capabilities. Performance and trust is vital to stabilize funding of WHO and its priority programmes.


Evidence based health policy together with change methodology
In many cases we have sufficient evidence and proper solutions in theory for WHAT should be done. We also have the sad experience that the best theoretical solutions fail in implementation when we have to initiate behavioural change. Let's change our experiences with a high failure rate in change or local actions. Changes should be evidence based and balanced with behavioural insights. No technical solution is valid without an implementation and consultative change methodology. No external solution is valid without local ownership. Working on WHAT should go together with HOW. This approach will be the key methodological element of my work.


Renewed global partnership
Health problems are far more urging and challenging than what a single organisation could ever face. I will work to achieve effective collaboration partnerships and coordinated actions within UN and with member states, donors, international stakeholders and civil society. WHO should renew partnerships acting as a leader umbrella organization in its changing institutional environment.

Analysing the manifestos of the candidates for Director-General of WHO

In my view, a more thorough analysis of the available resources might have allowed a richer insight to the candidates' positions on the SDGs - says Dr. Miklós Szócska.

By Miklós Szócska, 01/19/17

Q&A: WHO director-general candidates' views on global health

Six candidates in the race to be director-general of the World Health Organization outline their priorities and vision for global health.

12/09/2016

Will you support a patient-centred R&D agreement?—Response from Miklós Szócska

In response to the open letter on patient-centred research and development (R&D),failures and imbalances that characterise the global pharmaceutical market have long been recognised and dealt with, although no breakthrough has been reached in finding real solutions to these problems.

By Miklós Szócska, 01/18/17

Election sees WHO's future role in question

"The WHO needs to be 'agile' in responding to outbreaks, including by knowing what not to do" - Szócska told Devex.

12/09/2016

Who Will Be The Next Leader Of WHO?

Who will be the World Health Organization's next director-general? In September, the U.N. agency announced the six nominees, four men and two women, ranging from a cardiologist from Pakistan to a ormer punk rocker from Hungary.

12/09/2016

Up Close and Personal with WHO Director-General Candidates

The Director-General is WHO's chief technical and administrative officer, who represents and oversees WHO's international health work. The appointment is of great importance to our community of global health and rights advocates, and even more so to girls and women around the globe.


Hungary hopes health app will launch new era of care

A small European country is making a big push to better link its 10 million citizens to medical care. Dr. Miklos Szócska, former Minister of State for Health said every health institution should be shifted to the centrally run cloud database by next summer or fall.

By Helen Collis, 11/29/16

Two of the six candidates answered a question put to them by Intellectual Property Watch

Two of the six candidates, Dr. Szocska and Dr. Nabarro, answered a question put to them by Intellectual Property Watch relating to medicines prices, innovation and intellectual property. Here are their answers.

11/03/2016
By Alexandra Nightingale, 11/22/16

Chatham House's Question Time event

Five of the six candidates for the 2017 WHO Director-General election discussed their candidacy at Chatham House's Question Time event

11/03/2016

'Better health and stronger WHO'

Dr. Miklós Szócska, candidate for the WHO Director-General position, presented his programme at Semmelweis University

11/02/2016

WHO's Director-General candidates: visions and priorities

A new Director-General of WHO will be selected in May, 2017. Richard Horton and Udani Samarasekera asked the six candidates competing for the position about their candidacy.

By Richard Horton, Udani Samarasekera, 10/13/16

Candidates stake their claim to be next leader of World Health Organization

On 1 and 2 November health officials, online journalists, and indeed anyone else with a bit too much time on their hands, had the opportunity to watch the six candidates in action at a special forum at WHO headquarters.

By Ben Duncan, 11/04/16

Europe's health systems on life support

Paying for 'results' and sin taxes are among the measures to curb costs, change behavior.

By Carmen Paun, 9/30/16

Global health chief race set with new entrants

Three new entrants in the race bringing total candidates to six.

By Natalie Huet, 9/22/16

Six in the running to be next World Health Organization leader

Six in the running to be next World Health Organization leader

By Kate Kelland, 9/23/16

World Health Organization names six candidates running for director-general

Six people from Europe, Africa, and Asia are in the running to become the next director-general of the World Health Organization, the Geneva-based agency announced on Friday.

By Helen Branswell, 9/23/16


Dr. Miklós Szócska graduated at the Semmelweis University of Medicine in 1989. He holds a Master of Public Administration degree from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University (1998), and a Ph.D. from the Semmelweis University in the field of change management (2003).

His interest in the management of health services and organisations emerged in the late '80s-when he served as a student president elected from the opposition- before the Hungarian regime change. After his graduation at the Semmelweis University he and his colleagues initiated the creation of the Health Services Management Training Centre (HSMTC) which was officially established in 1995. Between 1995 and 2000 he was serving as the deputy director and in 2000 he was appointed to be the director of the Centre.

Between 2010-2014 Dr. Szócska served a full electoral term as the Minister of State for Health of the Hungarian Government. During his term he developed an evidence based consultative health policy. Besides managing to keep the sustainability of the Hungarian health services during economic crisis he also introduced a broad range of significant health reforms among others: the implementation of a radical public health regulatory framework with success and popular support. This included the full ban of smoking in public places and workplaces, the safety limitation of trans fat content of food, and the introduction of public health tax on food and beverages with added sugar and salt. In his four years he also utilized central capacity planning for the rationalisation and regionalisation of the health care provision system as well as designed new efficient patient pathways.

Since the end of his term in office he serves again as the Director of HSMTC. His areas of professional interest cover a range of topics - development of organisations, management of change and leadership. He and his colleagues had extensive research in health human resources migration and HR strategy for health. Most recently he focuses on network analysis, big data solutions and data mining. The latest development of a case-based crisis communication training is to be launched early next year.

Due to his experience in shaping e-Health strategy on European and national level, he became responsible for the developments of the Institute of Digital Health Sciences at Semmelweis University.

In 2016 Dr. Szócska was nominated by the Hungarian Government for the Director-General position of the WHO.

Dr. Szócska and his wife who is also a physician, bring up three children.

Dr. Miklós Szócska

Candidate for Director-General,
World Health Organization

Analysing the manifestos of the candidates for Director-General of WHO

In my view, a more thorough analysis of the available resources might have allowed a richer insight to the candidates' positions on the SDGs - says Dr. Miklós Szócska.

By Miklós Szócska, 01/19/17

Q&A: WHO director-general candidates' views on global health

Six candidates in the race to be director-general of the World Health Organization outline their priorities and vision for global health.

12/09/2016

Will you support a patient-centred R&D agreement?—Response from Miklós Szócska

In response to the open letter on patient-centred research and development (R&D),failures and imbalances that characterise the global pharmaceutical market have long been recognised and dealt with, although no breakthrough has been reached in finding real solutions to these problems.

By Miklós Szócska, 01/18/17

Election sees WHO's future role in question

"The WHO needs to be 'agile' in responding to outbreaks, including by knowing what not to do" - Szócska told Devex.

12/09/2016

Who Will Be The Next Leader Of WHO?

Who will be the World Health Organization's next director-general? In September, the U.N. agency announced the six nominees, four men and two women, ranging from a cardiologist from Pakistan to a ormer punk rocker from Hungary.

12/09/2016

Up Close and Personal with WHO Director-General Candidates

The Director-General is WHO's chief technical and administrative officer, who represents and oversees WHO's international health work. The appointment is of great importance to our community of global health and rights advocates, and even more so to girls and women around the globe.


Hungary hopes health app will launch new era of care

A small European country is making a big push to better link its 10 million citizens to medical care. Dr. Miklos Szócska, former Minister of State for Health said every health institution should be shifted to the centrally run cloud database by next summer or fall.

By Helen Collis, 11/29/16

Two of the six candidates answered a question put to them by Intellectual Property Watch

Two of the six candidates, Dr. Szocska and Dr. Nabarro, answered a question put to them by Intellectual Property Watch relating to medicines prices, innovation and intellectual property. Here are their answers.

11/03/2016
By Alexandra Nightingale, 11/22/16

Chatham House's Question Time event

Five of the six candidates for the 2017 WHO Director-General election discussed their candidacy at Chatham House's Question Time event

11/03/2016

'Better health and stronger WHO'

Dr. Miklós Szócska, candidate for the WHO Director-General position, presented his programme at Semmelweis University

11/02/2016

Europe's health systems on life support

Paying for 'results' and sin taxes are among the measures to curb costs, change behavior.

By Carmen Paun, 9/30/16

Global health chief race set with new entrants

Three new entrants in the race bringing total candidates to six.

By Natalie Huet, 9/22/16

Six in the running to be next World Health Organization leader

Six in the running to be next World Health Organization leader

By Kate Kelland, 9/23/16

World Health Organization names six candidates running for director-general

Six people from Europe, Africa, and Asia are in the running to become the next director-general of the World Health Organization, the Geneva-based agency announced on Friday.

By Helen Branswell, 9/23/16

Dr. Miklós Szócska

director@emk.sote.hu
Address: 1125 Budapest, Kútvölgyi út 2, Hungary
Postbox: 1428 Budapest Pf. 2, Hungary
Twitter:

Dr. Miklós Szócska graduated at the Semmelweis University (SU) of Medicine in 1989. He holds a Master of Public Administration degree from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University (1998), and a Ph.D. from the Semmelweis University in the field of change management (2003).

His interest in the management of health services and organisations emerged in the late '80s-when he served as a student president elected from the opposition- before the Hungarian regime change. After his graduation at the SU he and his colleagues initiated the creation of the Health Services Management Training Centre (HSMTC) which was officially established in 1995. Between 1995 and 2000 he was serving as the deputy director and in 2000 he was appointed to be the director of the Centre.

Between 2010-2014 Dr. Szócska served a full electoral term as the Minister of State for Health of the Hungarian Government. During his term he developed an evidence based consultative health policy. Besides managing to keep the sustainability of the Hungarian health services during economic crisis he also introduced a broad range of significant health reforms among others: the implementation of a radical public health regulatory framework with success and popular support. This included the full ban of smoking in public places and workplaces, the safety limitation of trans fat content of food, and the introduction of public health tax on food and beverages with added sugar and salt. In his four years he also utilized central capacity planning for the rationalisation and regionalisation of the health care provision system as well as designed new efficient patient pathways.

Since the end of his term in office he serves again as the Director of HSMTC. His areas of professional interest cover a range of topics - development of organisations, management of change and leadership. He and his colleagues had extensive research in health human resources migration and HR strategy for health. Most recently he focuses on network analysis, big data solutions and data mining. The latest development of a case-based crisis communication training is to be launched early next year.

Due to his experience in shaping e-Health strategy on European and national level, he became responsible for the developments of the Institute of Digital Health Sciences at Semmelweis University.

In 2016 Dr. Szócska was nominated by the Hungarian Government for the Director-General position of the WHO.

Dr. Szócska and his wife who is also a physician, bring up three children.

Challenges for global health

The consequences of climate change like water crisis, emerging & novel diseases, pandemics, the impact of irresponsible individual and social behaviour engender utter challenges for humanity. We should step up to solve pandemics and health problems generated by human behaviour or social interactions like unhealthy consumer habits, lifestyle, marketing or the imprudent use of antibiotics. We have to be ready to resolve the concerns raised by decision making or business models that deliver short term gains instead of long term sustainability, or monopoly pricing instead of accessibility and equity in health. The high level commitment to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) provides an unprecedented momentum to work on solutions in the comprehensive range of determinants of health.

Better Health, Stronger WHO

With responsibility for global health, as the director general of WHO I should work for:
  • helping people on this planet to be healthier and more cautious for their health,
  • promoting universal health coverage to protect the healthy and those who get sick and fostering health systems which are resilient, equitable and ever growing in quality,
  • properly trained, committed, motivated, innovative health labour force to provide health promotion, prevention, cure and care,
  • a strong WHO as the indisputable, impartial and independent leader in global health.


Better Health

Two front struggle for health improvement - those in need and urgency should come first
Fighting pandemics with utmost agility and culturally tailored interventions. Supporting local developments and actions with global rapid response teams, complementing weak or missing capacities. Special attention should be paid to countries emerging from conflicts without public administration systems. Public health structures should be integral part of the reconstruction, respecting national leadership.
Fighting NCDs globally with social mobilisation and awareness for behaviour change.


Sharing the risk in universal health coverage and pandemics
Despite the unprecedented efforts of global donors we have to understand that neither the implementation of SDGs nor sharing the risks could be managed without sustainable funding. It is time to start the long term effort for institutional resource generation to foster universal coverage and promote pandemic risk sharing. Innovative economic models for generating resources could only happen in dialogue with governmental, civil and non governmental actors. Investments in health should promote efficiency, prioritizing prevention, promotion, primary care and integrated patient pathways.


Health human resources developments and balancing migration globally in coordinated partnership
Building universal health coverage starts with strong foundations of community and primary care professionals. The Global Code of Practice on the International Recruitment of Health Personnel should be complemented with global, regional and national strategic actions in human resources development recognizing the link between health employment and economic growth.


Promoting innovation and technology to improve accessibility and equity
Latest technological developments make new forms prevention and of care possible and offer new opportunities for humanity. mHealth, eHealth solutions, wearable devices and point of care technologies can take cost effective diagnostics and therapy to places where they never existed before and can provide health care for those in the flow of migration.
In dialogue with a broad range of stakeholders we have to work for new innovative business models for high priced medicines and technologies, and new antibiotics.


Back
Next to Stronger WHO

Better Health, Stronger WHO

With responsibility for global health, as the director general of WHO I should work for:
  • helping people on this planet to be healthier and more cautious for their health,
  • promoting universal health coverage to protect the healthy and those who get sick and fostering health systems which are resilient, equitable and ever growing in quality,
  • properly trained, committed, motivated, innovative health labour force to provide health promotion, prevention, cure and care,
  • a strong WHO as the indisputable, impartial and independent leader in global health.


Stronger WHO

Impartial leader in global health and change for health
I envisage a strong WHO as the indisputable, impartial and independent leader in global health and a leading international change agent for health. Breaking out of the inbreeding of our internal professional wish lists, the health community should be able to influence the agendas of political leaders and fiscal decision makers and make them act towards solutions. WHO should take a role of independent knowledge centre and translate knowledge to action in assistance to member states in their developments and health reforms.


Resilient, action and performance oriented WHO
Promoting the idea of resilient health systems towards member states, should go hand in hand with working for a resilient WHO. The global portfolio of projects should be managed in a structured framework focusing on teamwork, results, problem solving, and be enhanced by my personal commitment and accountability for member states. We should improve change management capacities and capacities for culturally tailored local interventions together with the development of rapid response teams and task forces to support and complement country efforts. We should rebuild trust and prevent scapegoating by strengthening the risk communication capabilities. Performance and trust is vital to stabilize funding of WHO and its priority programmes.


Evidence based health policy together with change methodology
In many cases we have sufficient evidence and proper solutions in theory for WHAT should be done. We also have the sad experience that the best theoretical solutions fail in implementation when we have to initiate behavioural change. Let's change our experiences with a high failure rate in change or local actions. Changes should be evidence based and balanced with behavioural insights. No technical solution is valid without an implementation and consultative change methodology. No external solution is valid without local ownership. Working on WHAT should go together with HOW. This approach will be the key methodological element of my work.


Renewed global partnership
Health problems are far more urging and challenging than what a single organisation could ever face. I will work to achieve effective collaboration partnerships and coordinated actions within UN and with member states, donors, international stakeholders and civil society. WHO should renew partnerships acting as a leader umbrella organization in its changing institutional environment.


Better Health, Stronger WHO

With responsibility for global health, as the director general of WHO I should work for:
  • helping people on this planet to be healthier and more cautious for their health,
  • promoting universal health coverage to protect the healthy and those who get sick and fostering health systems which are resilient, equitable and ever growing in quality,
  • properly trained, committed, motivated, innovative health labour force to provide health promotion, prevention, cure and care,
  • a strong WHO as the indisputable, impartial and independent leader in global health.


Better Health

Two front struggle for health improvement - those in need and urgency should come first
Fighting pandemics with utmost agility and culturally tailored interventions. Supporting local developments and actions with global rapid response teams, complementing weak or missing capacities. Special attention should be paid to countries emerging from conflicts without public administration systems. Public health structures should be integral part of the reconstruction, respecting national leadership.
Fighting NCDs globally with social mobilisation and awareness for behaviour change.


Sharing the risk in universal health coverage and pandemics
Despite the unprecedented efforts of global donors we have to understand that neither the implementation of SDGs nor sharing the risks could be managed without sustainable funding. It is time to start the long term effort for institutional resource generation to foster universal coverage and promote pandemic risk sharing. Innovative economic models for generating resources could only happen in dialogue with governmental, civil and non governmental actors. Investments in health should promote efficiency, prioritizing prevention, promotion, primary care and integrated patient pathways.


Health human resources developments and balancing migration globally in coordinated partnership
Building universal health coverage starts with strong foundations of community and primary care professionals. The Global Code of Practice on the International Recruitment of Health Personnel should be complemented with global, regional and national strategic actions in human resources development recognizing the link between health employment and economic growth.


Promoting innovation and technology to improve accessibility and equity
Latest technological developments make new forms prevention and of care possible and offer new opportunities for humanity. mHealth, eHealth solutions, wearable devices and point of care technologies can take cost effective diagnostics and therapy to places where they never existed before and can provide health care for those in the flow of migration.
In dialogue with a broad range of stakeholders we have to work for new innovative business models for high priced medicines and technologies, and new antibiotics.


Stronger WHO

Impartial leader in global health and change for health
I envisage a strong WHO as the indisputable, impartial and independent leader in global health and a leading international change agent for health. Breaking out of the inbreeding of our internal professional wish lists, the health community should be able to influence the agendas of political leaders and fiscal decision makers and make them act towards solutions. WHO should take a role of independent knowledge centre and translate knowledge to action in assistance to member states in their developments and health reforms.


Resilient, action and performance oriented WHO
Promoting the idea of resilient health systems towards member states, should go hand in hand with working for a resilient WHO. The global portfolio of projects should be managed in a structured framework focusing on teamwork, results, problem solving, and be enhanced by my personal commitment and accountability for member states. We should improve change management capacities and capacities for culturally tailored local interventions together with the development of rapid response teams and task forces to support and complement country efforts. We should rebuild trust and prevent scapegoating by strengthening the risk communication capabilities. Performance and trust is vital to stabilize funding of WHO and its priority programmes.


Evidence based health policy together with change methodology
In many cases we have sufficient evidence and proper solutions in theory for WHAT should be done. We also have the sad experience that the best theoretical solutions fail in implementation when we have to initiate behavioural change. Let's change our experiences with a high failure rate in change or local actions. Changes should be evidence based and balanced with behavioural insights. No technical solution is valid without an implementation and consultative change methodology. No external solution is valid without local ownership. Working on WHAT should go together with HOW. This approach will be the key methodological element of my work.


Renewed global partnership
Health problems are far more urging and challenging than what a single organisation could ever face. I will work to achieve effective collaboration partnerships and coordinated actions within UN and with member states, donors, international stakeholders and civil society. WHO should renew partnerships acting as a leader umbrella organization in its changing institutional environment.


Back
Next to Better Health

Better Health, Stronger WHO

With responsibility for global health, as the director general of WHO I should work for:

Better Health, Stronger WHO

With responsibility for global health, as the director general of WHO I should work for:

Better Health

Two front struggle for health improvement - those in need and urgency should come first
Fighting pandemics with utmost agility and culturally tailored interventions. Supporting local developments and actions with global rapid response teams, complementing weak or missing capacities. Special attention should be paid to countries emerging from conflicts without public administration systems. Public health structures should be integral part of the reconstruction, respecting national leadership.
Fighting NCDs globally with social mobilisation and awareness for behaviour change.


Sharing the risk in universal health coverage and pandemics
Despite the unprecedented efforts of global donors we have to understand that neither the implementation of SDGs nor sharing the risks could be managed without sustainable funding. It is time to start the long term effort for institutional resource generation to foster universal coverage and promote pandemic risk sharing. Innovative economic models for generating resources could only happen in dialogue with governmental, civil and non governmental actors. Investments in health should promote efficiency, prioritizing prevention, promotion, primary care and integrated patient pathways.


Health human resources developments and balancing migration globally in coordinated partnership
Building universal health coverage starts with strong foundations of community and primary care professionals. The Global Code of Practice on the International Recruitment of Health Personnel should be complemented with global, regional and national strategic actions in human resources development recognizing the link between health employment and economic growth.


Promoting innovation and technology to improve accessibility and equity
Latest technological developments make new forms prevention and of care possible and offer new opportunities for humanity. mHealth, eHealth solutions, wearable devices and point of care technologies can take cost effective diagnostics and therapy to places where they never existed before and can provide health care for those in the flow of migration.
In dialogue with a broad range of stakeholders we have to work for new innovative business models for high priced medicines and technologies, and new antibiotics.

Home

About

1995 - present - Founder, later Director
Health Services Management Training Centre, Semmelweis University Budapest (Hungary)

2010-2014 Minister of State for Health
Ministry of Human Resources, Government of Hungary

2009 Doctoral Diploma (PhD)
In the field of change management
Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary)

1998 Master of Public Administration
Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Cambridge, Massachusetts (USA)

1989 Medical Doctor
Semmelweis University of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Budapest (Hungary)

Challenges for global health

The consequences of climate change like water crisis, emerging & novel diseases, pandemics, the impact of irresponsible individual and social behaviour engender utter challenges for humanity. We should step up to solve pandemics and health problems generated by human behaviour or social interactions like unhealthy consumer habits, lifestyle, marketing or the imprudent use of antibiotics. We have to be ready to resolve the concerns raised by decision making or business models that deliver short term gains instead of long term sustainability, or monopoly pricing instead of accessibility and equity in health. The high level commitment to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) provides an unprecedented momentum to work on solutions in the comprehensive range of determinants of health.

Better Health, Stronger WHO

With responsibility for global health, as the director general of WHO I should work for:
Home